Trine four: The Nightmare Prince Assessment (PS4)

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Trine 4: The Nightmare Prince Review - Screenshot 1 of 6

The very first two games in Frozenbyte’s Trine series have been whimsical 2D puzzle platformers. A third title, Artifacts of Energy, switched to 3D and supplied a shorter adventure that left some fans cold. Trine four throws away that further dimension, and feels considerably far more like the series at its ideal.

Returning players will know the drill by now, but no context is required to jump correct into this fourth tale. Pontius is a rotund knight with a melee attack and a shield, Amadeus is the cheerful mage that can conjure boxes, and Zoya is a sneaky thief with a bow. Journeying by means of visually captivating and disparate environments, you will have to combine the capabilities of all 3 characters by switching in between them to resolve puzzles blocking your path.

The skeletal story sees our trio of heroes set off to retrieve a runaway prince, whose nightmares are manifesting and terrorising the land. Alternatively of a wealthy narrative, we get the charming banter of the central trio and the beautiful art design and style. In the kingdom of Trine, even dungeons and caves are complete of vibrant fauna and minute detail. Landscapes really feel epic regardless of the restrictive point of view, and wonderful fantasy creatures await in every single region.

The central puzzle mechanics are nonetheless clever and there are lots of distinctive strategies to tackle them. Crossing a perilous chasm could be a job for Amadeus’ levitation, Zoya’s rope, or some mixture of everyone’s skills. Multiplayer is back, so you can group and navigate the Rube Goldberg environmental design and style as a group. Aside from some impressive boss fights, battling the prince’s shadow creatures is the games weakest aspect. Combat feels stiff and imprecise, but that feels like a mild quibble about such a regularly pleasing knowledge.

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